RenderingsUnbuiltWindsor

Proposed Elks Hall

The Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks (B.P.O.E.) announced in 1927 that they had acquired a property on the south west corner of Sandwich Street (Riverside Drive West) & Park Place (Randolph). The ambitious plans for the building were drawn up by Detroit architect Ben Dore, who was associated with C. Howard Crane’s firm. The building was planned to be built by 1928, with the goal of attracting the annual convention of the B.P.O.E of Canada and Newfoundland.

The main tower of the clubhouse was planned for 11 storey, with all rooms to be devoted to living quarters for members. The second seven storey tower was also to contain living quarters above the second floor. The first two floors were planned to contain club rooms and lounges, restaurants and a banquet hall. A grill and large swimming pool were planned for the basement. A loggia overlooking the Detroit river was also accounted for. The planned building was going to be clad in either stucco or Indiana Limestone. The project was planned to cost $750,000 (about $11.5 million today). The capital to erect the building was planned to be raised through the sale of club memberships. The site comprised of 392 feet of river frontage on the north side of Riverside Drive, and a lot 145 feet square at the south west corner of Riverside and Randolph.

The rooms of the club were to be laid out on various levels all having views of the river. The main building was designed to be 68 by 84 feet, with the longer side facing the river. A two storey building would form the base of the building with a seven storey tower rising out of it, with another 11 storey tower rising at the rear.

The main floor was to house a spacious lounge, lobby, billiards room, ladies’ lounge, main restaurant and kitchens. A few steps down would lead to the men’s grill in the basement, along with the locker rooms and a swimming pool. The showers, dressing and drying rooms for both men and women would also be located on this level. A sub basement below that was to be used for storage as well as the boiler for heating the complex. Above the lobby, there was to be a mezzanine level, on this level was to be located the main banquet hall and a ballroom. A large loggia overlooking the Detroit river. Six private dining rooms were also planned for this level.

The towers were to be accessed by elevators, and would contain over 100 bedrooms. They were designed to be adjoining as to make larger suites, if needed. Each room would contain a bath.

Related posts
ChurchesRenderings

834 Lawrence Rd

Buildings of WindsorWindsor

Jackson Park Bandshell

DemolitionLost WindsorOld PhotographsWindsor

Tunnel Bar-B-Q 2015

Old PhotographsWindsor

2422 Gladstone Avenue

Recent Comments:

  • JM on 841 Ouellette – Final Days: “Thank you for this timely story. I must say that the 1976 photo displayed characteristics of the better days. Renovations…May 6, 13:53
  • Robert on Joseph L. Reaume House – 1924: “If I recall, it had a red tile roof which was eye-catching against the white walls. Always a favourite of…Apr 26, 17:55
  • Jim Kennedy on Joseph L. Reaume House – 1924: “Thank you for that post, and all your others. You are doing a great service capturing lost Windsor! This Reaume…Apr 25, 09:00
  • Dave Bensette on Yawkey Farms: “Thanks for the interesting read. I grew up at Matchette and Chappus in the 1970’s. Some of that stuff sounds…Apr 16, 17:10
  • D Ouellette on Yawkey Farms: “I grew up on Broadway between 18 Hwy and Matchette Road. The transport company on the corner of Broadway and…Mar 29, 13:33

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *