Photo Du JourWindsor

Medical Arts – Part II

An exterior view as it looks today.

A view of the front entrance.

Touches of the craze of the times are visible in the Egyptian Revival elements over the front entrance way. When first built there was no door at this entrance. The wood doors just inside the vestibule was originally the front entrance. The two retail spaces on the main floor were then accessible without entering the building.

These were the guys hidden behind the lighted signs visible in yesterday’s photos. You can see where the holes were punched to mount the signs.

They are both in pretty good shape, although the right hand side of this guy has a bit of water erosion because of the broken downspout dumping water on his head…

Looking at the great wooden and leaded glass entrance to the building from the vestibule. Putting in the glass front door probably saved this wood from ruin.

A view of the light fixture in the vestibule.

A view of the original chrome door pulls.

Looking back at the entrance from the lobby.

A view of the lobby, looking west. For eight years of vacancy, the water damage isn’t really that bad.

A view of the former retail spaces, with the large showcase windows facing the lobby.

A view of some of the water damage. The lobby ceiling is all painted with faux paint techniques.

The walls and floor are lined with marble, and are in great shape. Looking back at the lobby towards Ouellette.

Interestingly enough, there is a fireplace in one of the sub basements.

A typical view of an upper floor corridor.

Typical office view.

Another office view.

This was the only original door we saw on our tour. Most of them had been replaced with steel fire doors.

Looking out the window at the fire escape mounted on the south side. Hotel Dieu is visible in the background.

In the mechanical penthouse on the roof, the elevator motor is the original dating to 1928. It is not functional, and the elevator is planned to be replaced and enlarged.

A view of the roof.

A view of the backside of the parapet visible from Ouellette.

Hopefully this project takes off. Windsor needs more stories of rehab, and reuse of our historic structures. Too bad it took someone from Calgary to realize the potential our historic structures have. After the Seagrave and Bank of Montreal, it’s refreshing to see an owner with some vision. 🙂

Maybe some local devellopers can learn a lesson or two from this project?

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