Old Newspaper StoriesWindsor

James Carlisle Pennington

J.C. Pennington was one of Windsor’s most prolific architects. He along with partner John Boyde designed a huge number of schools, churches and other buildings, from the 1910’s through the early 1960’s.

This house on Victoria Avenue was J.C. Pennington’s.

A few years ago at a local bookshop I was looking through the books on the bargain $1.00 table, when I found the inscription above inside one of them.

Windsor Star – August 9th, 1963:

One of Windsor’s best known architects, James Carlisle Pennington died Thursday while visiting his daughter in San Fransisco, Calif. He was 77. He suffered a heart attack.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed. Mr. Pennington lived at 1320 Victoria Ave.

Known throughout the profession for his high standards of performance, Mr. Pennington was the senior partner on the firm of Pennington and Carter and a native of the city where he practiced his profession all his life. He was regarded as the dean of the profession by his colleagues. He began his work here as early as 1908.

His earliest connection with the profession was in partnership with C. Howard Crane, who later became internationally known in the field of architecture. Then for many years, Mr. Pennington conducted business under his own name, designing and building scores of important structures in the Windsor area, including Walkerville Collegiate. He made a specialty of hospital work.

In 1957, Mr. Pennington formed the firm of Pennington & Carter along with William J. Carter, well known architect and former radio station executive. The firm has added many lasting monuments to the city’s building scene, including those at the University of Windsor, Metropolitan General Hospital, Hotel Dieu, Leamington Hospital and the newly projected Grace Hospital, to name but a few.

Mr. Pennington was active in Masonic circles in Windsor and a member of Central United Church.

His wife Hazel died in 1961. Survivors are two sons: James C. Pennington, Carsten, Alberta; Arthur of Belleville; two daughters: Mrs. Reginald (Betty) Franklin, San Francisco; Mrs. John (Dorothy) Findlay, Dresden.

There are three brothers: William and Wesley, both of Windsor and Albert E. Amherstburg. There are five sisters: Mrs. W. O. Austin, Windsor; Mrs. A.L. Laing and Mrs. Ernest Hathway, Toronto; Mrs. D.S. Douglas, Belle River, and Mrs. Keith Laird, Windsor. There are 10 grandchildren.

Today one of the men responsible for designing a huge amount of Windsor, lies in Windsor Grove Cemetery beside his wife Hazel, with nothing to indicate how he is responsible for so much of the architecture that we appreciate today.

Related posts
Lost WindsorNewsWindsor

Windsor: Then & Now

Notable WindsoritesOld Newspaper Stories

Fred Neal - 1855-1931

RenderingsWindsor

St George's Walkerville - 2017

Old PhotographsWindsor

391 Tecumseh Road East - Former Supertest Station

Recent Comments:

  • Mark on 711 Riverside Drive East: “Amazing it’s still standing. Hope they find a good use for it for generations to come.Oct 17, 02:03
  • Sam on Assumption Cemetery: “Did anyone find Cornelius Sexton?Oct 6, 22:03
  • Jo Nugent on Riverfront Follies Nightclub – c. 1973: “I have been trying to remember the owners of Tracy Starr’s and The Ultimate Topless Body Rub. Marty Handleman, but…Sep 29, 15:53
  • Jo-Anne on Hofer Brewery: “I am one of Vital’s Benoit granddaughters. My Dad, Allan was the second youngest of Vital’s children. I would also…Sep 15, 19:28
  • Sarah on Walkerville Tourist Camp Honeymoon Nest: “I love this! We have lost so much of our interesting history here in Windsor. Have you had much luck…Aug 26, 19:33

6 Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *